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Inside historic Alma Yard – Plymouth’s thriving new hub of creativity

For more than a decade, Eat Work Art has been revitalising disused buildings in London and transforming them into workspaces for independent creative communities to grow.

Now, the EWA team are looking outside the capital for the first time and have chosen Plymouth as the newest location in their portfolio of reinvented spaces.

Alma Yard is currently semi-launched with an initial 21 studios due to be completed in September, followed by ambitious plans to grow to up to 80 studios over the next 2-3 years.

Take a look inside with our video

This former rope and candlewick factory in Cattedown will become home to a community of creatives drawn to Plymouth’s flourishing arts scene and relaxed pace of life.

Located on an iconic coastal rise, the site’s period features – such as an original car lift – are illuminated by streams of natural light and lofty spaces.

These unique facets enrich the studios and workspaces, becoming the backdrop to this new and inspiring location.

Just a short walk from the city centre, Alma Yard promises to be a thriving hub of creativity.

Kate Fowler, Devon Manager at Eat Work Art, says: “We have revitalised this disused building into creative studios, offering a space where designers, artists, architects can all come together to innovate, collaborate and create.

“Sustainability is inherent in our regeneration work and we strive to enrich the communities we work in.

“Aiming to bring like-minded individuals together who champion innovation and collaboration, everyone is welcome, from individual start-up artisan traders to more established companies.

“Everything we do is centred around bringing people together to foster a community of great minds.”

Eat Work Art launched its first development in 2009 with the unforgettable Netil House in East London, a previously unloved Sixties’ building which has been transformed into a powerhouse of creativity, crowned with an iconic rooftop and memorable city skyline views.

A number of further projects followed at an old printworks in Hackney Downs, as well as Old Paradise Yard by the River Thames.

Alma Yard represents Eat Work Art’s first development outside London and reflects Plymouth’s growing arts and culture scene.

Matt Hubner, Senior Marketing and Communications Manager at Eat Work Art, says: “We believe that London no longer needs to be the epicentre of arts and culture in the UK.

“Although it’s been our home for Eat Work Art for the last 10 years, we now look to expand – and Plymouth is a place where we’ve seen a burgeoning arts and culture scene with so much diversity.

“Alma Yard was the perfect site for us because of the historical reference. A series of 18th and 19th century amazing buildings that have so much historical relevance within the region.

“It was the perfect place for us to come and build this thriving hub of creativity.”

Kate Fowler, Devon Manager at Eat Work Art, says: “We have revitalised this disused building into creative studios, offering a space where designers, artists, architects can all come together to innovate, collaborate and create.

“Sustainability is inherent in our regeneration work and we strive to enrich the communities we work in.

“Aiming to bring like-minded individuals together who champion innovation and collaboration, everyone is welcome, from individual start-up artisan traders to more established companies.

“Everything we do is centred around bringing people together to foster a community of great minds.”

Eat Work Art launched its first development in 2009 with the unforgettable Netil House in East London, a previously unloved Sixties’ building which has been transformed into a powerhouse of creativity, crowned with an iconic rooftop and memorable city skyline views.

A number of further projects followed at an old printworks in Hackney Downs, as well as Old Paradise Yard by the River Thames.

Alma Yard represents Eat Work Art’s first development outside London and reflects Plymouth’s growing arts and culture scene.

Matt Hubner, Senior Marketing and Communications Manager at Eat Work Art, says: “We believe that London no longer needs to be the epicentre of arts and culture in the UK.

“Although it’s been our home for Eat Work Art for the last 10 years, we now look to expand – and Plymouth is a place where we’ve seen a burgeoning arts and culture scene with so much diversity.

“Alma Yard was the perfect site for us because of the historical reference. A series of 18th and 19th century amazing buildings that have so much historical relevance within the region.

“It was the perfect place for us to come and build this thriving hub of creativity.”

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